TRIADAFILOPOULOS, Triadafilos

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Phil Triadafilopoulos is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He teaches courses in public policy and conducts research in the areas of immigration and citizenship policy. Professor Triadafilopoulos received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the New School for Social Research and is a former SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow. He also held a two-year visiting research fellowship at the Institute for Social Sciences, Humboldt University, through the German Academic Exchange Service, and is a member of the Ethnicity and Democratic Governance research team, a SSHRC-funded Major Collaborative Research Initiative. He is currently completing a book titled Becoming Multicultural: Immigration and the Politics of Citizenship in Canada and Germany. The book explores the liberalization of immigration and citizenship policies (and consequent expansion of membership boundaries) in Canada and Germany, paying particular attention to the interplay of shifting global norms and domestic politics. It will be published by the University of British Columbia Press in 2011.

Triadafilopoulos is also involved in a collaborative research project with Professor Anna Korteweg (Department of Sociology, UTM) on immigrant integration policies in Germany and the Netherlands. Their research focuses on how rights to religious freedom clash with gender equality and privacy rights in debates over immigrant integration. This work has sparked an interest in the institutional accommodation of Islam in Europe and North America. Some of Triadafilopoulos’ other projects include:
• an edited collection of essays on the politics of highly skilled immigration policy, titled Wanted and Welcome? Policies for Highly Skilled Immigrants in comparative Perspective
• an edited collection of essays marking the tenth anniversary of Germany’s 1999 citizenship reform
• article length papers on party politics in policy-making and citizenship politics and policy in Germany
• work on partition and population exchanges in twentieth-century Europe (with Toby Vogel)

Listing Details

Address
Department of Political Science, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3G3
Telephone
(416) 978-5442
Fax
(416) 978-5566
E-mail
Research Description
I am currently completing a book titled _Becoming Multicultural: Immigration and the Politics of Citizenship in Canada and Germany_. The book explores the liberalization of immigration and citizenship policies in Canada and Germany in the post-WWII period. I am interested in understanding why two countries that had used discriminatory immigration and citizenship policies to avoid cultural pluralization through the late-nineteenth and better part of the twentieth century found themselves so thoroughly transformed by immigration by the turn of the twenty-first. I argue that the emergence of a global human rights culture in the postwar period set new standards for liberal-democratic states. As a result, Canada's ability to maintain policies based on its prewar identity as a "white man's country" was compromised, as was Germany's efforts to reassert a "guest worker" policy based on compulsory rotation. The book will be published by the University of British Columbia Press in 2011. I am also involved in a collaborative research project (with Anna Korteweg) on immigrant integration policies in Germany and the Netherlands. I am interested in exploring how rights to religious freedom, gender equality and privacy intersect and sometimes clash in debates over immigrant integration and how different institutional contexts -- such as courts or legislatures -- influence the logic of political deliberation on integration. Other ongoing projects with a German focus include: . an evaluation of Germany's 1999 citizenship reform as regards immigrant integration . an exploration of the meaning of "social cohesion" in Germany . a critical review of citizenship and integration policy-making under the CDU-SPD Grand Coalition government (2005-2009) . an analysis of multiculturalism in Germany and the Netherlands (in which multiculturalism's 'death' in political discourse is contrasted to its vitality in structuring new public policy initiatives in the area of immigrant integration, especially in urban contexts).